Thursday, October 13, 2011

Knives... I Love Knives!

   I have always had a fascination with knives. I'm sure I got it from my Father. He always told me that a knife was like an individual. Each one was different and each had it's own 'personality'. He told me that before using a knife in the woods or just to whittle a bit, I should get to know it. I should learn what it's likes and dislikes were. By that, he meant learn what the knife will do easily and what it won't do. It sounds kinda Zen it it's totality but it's true.

   I owned a knife that was spectacular at cutting my flesh and the flesh of others who handled it. It seemed to have a taste for blood. I seldom picked it up when it didn't bite me. I traded that one off to some unsuspecting individual. Heh heh heh!

   I have blades that I use in the woods when I go camping. These are old friends that have never let me down. Like an old family dog, they just beg to be taken out to play and be used. Used to make tent stakes, a pot hanger or splitting some sticks to make a fire. I use them to cut food for the pot and I sometimes even use them to spear a piece of roasted meat straight from the fire and pop it into my mouth! Shown at the top are a BK&T Campanion and a custom skinner from Big Rock Forge.


   I have had knives that were good for nothing other than cutting string and opening packages. Good utility knives are easy to find.

   I have knives that I have purchased and have never used. Seems like a waste of money, but it pleases me. I sit and sharpen the edge of each one. I oil the blades, look at them, buff them up a bit then put them away for the next time.
  
   I have a couple of custom made knives that I specified the design and materials with the makers. One I use frequently and the other is a Drawer Queen... one of those that I just polish and oil and sharpen occasionally (not that it needs it - it's like a razor!) The one shown is from Big Rock Forge and it's a user!
http://www.bigrockforge.com/

  I have folding knives - some inexpensive and some rather pricey. I almost always have a knife of some sort in my pocket when I am out of the house. Like the Chris Reeve Small Sebenza shown to the right. It's one of those things that it's better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. Kinda like a life jacket on a boat, or seat belts in a car. http://www.chrisreeve.com/

   Knives are probably one of Man's oldest tools. As much as the knife has changed over the millenia it still remains basically the same - a sharp piece of material with a way to safely hold it in your hand. The earliest knives were merely pieces or shards of fractured rock. Then man figured out that if he started to knap or chip away at a piece of flint or obsidian, he could get the material sharper than a razor and in a shape that was more useful. The stone blade shown here is one that my Father found as a young man. (The yellow marker is included for size comparison.)

   From this basic concept men have redesigned and reconfigured the knife into more designs, styles and blade lengths than you can shake a stick at. The materials range from rock to the most advanced steels and ceramics. It's mind-boggling to think of the advancements that have been made in the cutlery industry just to improve on the rock knife.

   Being The Geezer, I have seen, held and used a lot of knives. I still see and covet many of the new and a few of the older designs. When I go camping, though... I take my old friends.

2 comments:

  1. Knives are a family thing I'm sure...it's in the genes. I collect knives and swords (and have a posting on my blog about them!) and my son is into knives and sharpens knives almost as well as Dad did. Being former chef and now a professional meat cutter he spends most of his time handling knives. Knives (and swords) are a thing of beauty. We are a family that likes being on the "edge' so to speak.....
    Le Petite Crone

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  2. I like blades and knifs to. I checked out the big rock link. Purty blades there!

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